Studies on handling sugarcane frozen early in March in advanced stages of development
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Studies on handling sugarcane frozen early in March in advanced stages of development by George Arceneaux

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sugarcane,
  • Climatic factors

Book details:

Edition Notes

Caption title.

Statementby George Arceneaux and R.B. Bisland
SeriesCircular / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 324, Circular (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 324.
ContributionsBisland, R. B. (Ralph Brownson), 1900-
The Physical Object
Pagination8 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25514235M
OCLC/WorldCa16718347

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The 10 stages of the Biologische Bundesanstalt, Bundessortenamt and Chemical Industry (BBCH) scale are used as the framework in this chapter to describe the development of sugarcane. Temperature is the key driver of development in all areas where sugarcane is grown; the sugarcane response to temperature is modified by water availability and Cited by: Temperature for different critical stages of sugarcane: The different critical stages are germination, tillering, early growth, active growth and elongation. Optimum temperature for sprouting (germination) of stem cuttings is 32° to 38°c. It slows down below 25°, reaches plateau between 30° File Size: KB. Presented here is a comprehensive account of both theoretical and practical aspects of sugarcane production. The first of two parts of the book deals with origin, distribution, soil and climatic requirements, seed bed preparation, cultural and nutrient requirements, fertilization, irrigation, ratooning, weeds, pests, diseases, ripening, and harvest. Sugarcane root systems are poorly studied and understood due to the perennial nature, tall stature, and the long cropping cycle. Whilst some field studies gave insights into sugarcane root traits, there is no detailed description of root and root system traits available. The objectives of our work were to establish a baseline of sugarcane root trait values that will serve for future studies.

Sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) is a perennial grass and one of the few plants which stores its carbohydrate reserves as sucrose. Its economic value lies in the stalks, and the sugar/sucrose they contain after crushing. Sugar cane supplies more than half of the world’s sugar consumption. In Brazil, it is moreover a major component of biofuel. sugarcane plant utilization has adverse effect on cane quality (Yadav et al., ). Availability of water is an important factor causing variation in sugarcane yield and juice quality. According to Azzazy et al., () water is the key to sugarcane growth, development and subsequent conversion of recoverable sugar to sucrose. Timeline of Sugar. BC – Archeological evidence tells us that sugarcane was first domesticated in in New Guinea by its inhabitants, who slowly spread their knowledge across Southeast Asia, southern China, and India.. BC – First historical reference of sugar comes from China, with the mentions of the India’s sugarcane fields in some of their ancient surviving texts. This new interactive multimedia tool is a Timeline that shows the successful story of the Brazilian sugarcane sector and its major contributions to a more sustainable future. From the arrival of sugarcane in Brazil passing through the sector’s sustainability programs, the consolidation of the flex-fuel technology, the emergence of bioplastics as well as airplanes powered by ethanol, the tool.

Bhavani B () Studies on the biology of sugarcane early shoot borer Chilo infuscatellus Snellen on artificial diet in north coastal region of Andhra Pradesh, India. Int J . The book explores sugarcane's 40 year history as a fuel for cars, along with its impressive leaps in production and productivity that have created a robust global market. In addition, new prospects for the future are discussed as promising applications in agroenergy, whether for biofuels or bioelectricity, or for bagasse pellets as an. Sugarcane: Agricultural Production, Bioenergy and Ethanol explores this vital source for "green" biofuel from the breeding and care of the plant all the way through to its effective and efficient transformation into bioenergy.. The book explores sugarcane's 40 year history as a fuel for cars, along with its impressive leaps in production and productivity that have created a robust global market. The origins and spread of sugarcane. Movement and development of the noble canes. The ancestry of cultivated sugarcane. The early commercial cane varieties. The botany of sugarcane. Cultivation of sugarcane. The production of sugar. Research. Developments in the twentieth century.